The Scottish Movement | #tbt Crafts Movement in Great Britain 1850-1915

Design for stencilled mural decoration.Miss Cranstons Tea Rooms. Charles Rennie Mackintosh. Hunterian Art Gallery.The Scottish movement occurred in the late 1880’s and 90’s, more than 20 years after Morris had established his first shop in London. The Glasgow School of Art GSA was the centre of the Arts and Crafts movement in Scotland. Four key figures, Charles Rennie Mackintosh, Herbert MacNair, Margaret and Frances MacDonald were known as ‘The Four’ who together created the vision which became world famous as the Glasgow Style.

via The Scottish Movement | The Arts & Crafts Movement in Great Britain 1850-1915.

Thinking about DTG but don’t want to spend a fortune.

Thinking about DTG but don’t want to spend a fortune.  Take a look at the

the remarkable and award winning Ricoh Ri100 DTG Printer.  

You can print images directly onto clothing fabrics (T Shirts / Hoodies / Tote Bags and many more) using state-of-the-art DTG technology. You can print a one-of-a-kind T-shirt or a personalized bag for a customer to take home then and there.

Even a beginner can create beautifully printed products both safely and easily. It has never been easier to widen your business scope than with this one machine.  It only takes 5 steps to create a high quality printed garment. 

For  £2999 ex VAT the Ricoh Ri100 comes with all you need to get going including the nifty curing unit.  Check out the video on YouTube.

If you need more information or interested please contact us.

Andy Warhol and Silk Screen Printing #tbt

https://i0.wp.com/www.sothebys.com/content/dam/sothebys-pages/blogs/ContemporaryCurrents/2013/10/warhol-liz1.jpg

Andy Warhol famously told Art News interviewer Gene Swenson, “The reason I’m painting this way is that I want to be a machine, and I feel that whatever I do and do machine-like is what I want to do.” Warhol was referring to his newfound process of silk-screen printing images repeatedly onto a single canvas. This act of undermining any translation or evidence of the artist’s hand in favor of a mass-produced, machine-like look appealed to Warhol. Once he discovered the process and implications of working with silk screens, the content of Warhol’s output as a painter became inextricably linked to the process by which he created his art.

Warhol’s grid-like paintings of dollar bills from 1962 are his earliest attempts at silk-screen printing, when the artist was still getting to know the process. At that time he used his own drawings as the basis to create the silk-screened print. He reportedly was not entirely happy with the result, calling 129 Die in Jet!, another painting based on a drawing, “smeary.” But Warhol soon learned that it was possible to use photographs as the basis for a silk-screen print, and the resulting image proved much sharper – though not too sharp – and thus to Warhol’s liking.Warhol’s Liz #1 Early Colored Liz, which will be featured in Sotheby’s upcoming Evening sale of Contemporary Art on November 13, illustrates well Warhol’s process as a painter.

Materially, the artwork consists of acrylic paint and silk-screen ink on canvas. We see a flat yellow background surrounding a spotty yet recognizable image of Elizabeth Taylor, the actress and celebrity, who, like Marilyn Monroe and Jackie Kennedy, repeatedly served as Warhol’s subject.Andy Warhol’s Liz #1 Early Colored Liz will be offered at the Contemporary Art Evening sale on 13 November.Here Warhol appropriated a 1950s publicity photo of Taylor as the source material for the silk screen. Warhol worked with professionals to have the photos he chose transferred onto the mesh of a silk screen. When Warhol passed an ink-laden squeegee over the mesh as the silk screen sat atop his canvas, ink would pass through the mesh and impress a print of his image onto the canvas. Areas of the mesh where a layer of glue has been applied – in Warhol’s case, the “negative” space of the photos he selected – keep paint from passing through to the canvas.

Observing the grainier areas of Liz’s hair, it’s clear that Warhol first applied the yellow paint before adding the layer of black ink that comprises her face. Her intense red lips and eye shadow were also applied during separate passes of the squeegee. To Warhol the noticeable “imperfections” – such as the faint areas of Liz’s hair and the way the lipstick bleeds onto her chin – weren’t signs of a poorly pulled silk screen-image but rather welcome indications of how chance influenced his work. As Warhol’s biographers Tony Scherman and David Dalton point out, Warhol “was not after a picture-perfect, sharp-edged result; he wanted the trashy immediacy of a tabloid news photo.”By his use of the silk-screen process mixed with high-key acrylic paint, Warhol imbued Liz #1 Early Colored Liz with a kind of tragic radiance. And by re-using the silk screen of the ’50s publicity photo for other portraits of the film star and tabloid fixation, Warhol investigated through multiplicity the commodification of fame.

 

Still today Andy Warhol makes the news

QC Godwin-Ternbach Museum Receives Warhol Silkscreens | www.qgazette.com | Queens Gazette: The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts has given the Godwin-Ternbach Museum at Queens College seven color silkscreen prints by the celebrated pop artist.

via Andy Warhol and His Process | Sotheby’s.

New silver ink allows screen printing of circuits without thermal curing

JAPAN-based Tanaka Holdings says it has developed a silver paste that allows circuits to be screen-printed and cured with ultraviolet light only.The UV700-SR1J does not require thermal curing to form conductive electronic circuits. According to Tanaka Holdings, the circuit can be screen printed on a base material using its silver paste, then cured by exposing it to UV light for around 10 seconds, which instantly hardens the printed film even at room temperature.

via New silver ink allows screen printing of circuits without thermal curing.

Dummies Guide to Screen Printing | Wicked Printing Stuff

Dummies Guide to Screen Printing We talk to a lot of people who want to start screen printing but are not quite sure of the process and what’s really involved. So we thought we would write a high level process overview, to give you a little insight into how to get started. If you are a hobbyist, artist or commercial printer, the processes are pretty similar. We are going to work through the process of taking a blank garment to producing a garment with a printed logo………………..more details

via Dummies Guide to Screen Printing | Wicked Printing Stuff.