10 Things You Didn’t Know About T-Shirts, Facts About Tee Shirts

Love this blog post 10 Things You Didn’t Know About T-Shirts

1.) Cotton has been grown for over 6,000 years.

2.) The word “t-shirt” first appeared in the Merriam-Webster dictionary in the 1920’s. Two other best-selling books during the same time period were Farewell To Arms and The Great Gatsby.

3.) That’s a lot of dough for some t-shirts!

4.) In 1939 the first promotional t-shirt was printed for the movie “The Wizard of Oz”.

5.) “Absorbent” cotton will retain 24-27 times its own weight in water and is stronger wet than when dry.

6.) There are 35,000 cotton farms in the U.S. and 98% percent of cotton is grown in Alabama, Arkansas, Arizona, California, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, New Mexico, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee and Texas.

7.) T-Shirts made from recycled cotton prevent over five billion tons of textile waste from entering landfills each year.

8.) Top 5 Cotton Producing Countries (2009)

China: 32 Million Bales

India: 23.5 Million Bales

United States: 12.4 Million Bales

Pakistan: 9.8 Million Bales

Brazil: 5.5 Million Bales

9.) Annual Dollars Generated by Industry

Cotton: $25Billion

Candy: $17Billion

Jewelry: $7Billion

Music: $3Billion

10.) It takes six miles of yarn to make one t-shirt.

http://www.youdesignit.com/information/10-facts-about-t-shirts for some great graphics.

History of Printing for Kids!

For four thousand years after the invention of writing in Iraq, all writing was done by hand, a character at a time. When people needed a copy of a book, they had to pay a scribe to copy it out for them by hand. Of course this made books very expensive, and only the richest people could have them.

via History of Printing for Kids!.

The oldest Ink – #tbt

The history of Chinese inks can be traced back to the 23rd century BC, with the utilization of natural plant (plant dyes), animal, and mineral inks based on such materials as graphite that were ground with water and applied with ink brushes. Evidence for the earliest Chinese inks, similar to modern inksticks, is around 256 BC in the end of the Warring States period and produced from soot and animal glue.[5] The best inks for drawing or painting on paper or silk are produced from the resin of the pine tree. They must be between 50 and 100 years old. The Chinese inkstick is produced with a fish glue, whereas Japanese glue (膠 “nikawa”) is from cow or stag.[6]

via Ink – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

The Scottish Movement | #tbt Crafts Movement in Great Britain 1850-1915

Design for stencilled mural decoration.Miss Cranstons Tea Rooms. Charles Rennie Mackintosh. Hunterian Art Gallery.The Scottish movement occurred in the late 1880’s and 90’s, more than 20 years after Morris had established his first shop in London. The Glasgow School of Art GSA was the centre of the Arts and Crafts movement in Scotland. Four key figures, Charles Rennie Mackintosh, Herbert MacNair, Margaret and Frances MacDonald were known as ‘The Four’ who together created the vision which became world famous as the Glasgow Style.

via The Scottish Movement | The Arts & Crafts Movement in Great Britain 1850-1915.

Andy Warhol and Silk Screen Printing #tbt

https://i0.wp.com/www.sothebys.com/content/dam/sothebys-pages/blogs/ContemporaryCurrents/2013/10/warhol-liz1.jpg

Andy Warhol famously told Art News interviewer Gene Swenson, “The reason I’m painting this way is that I want to be a machine, and I feel that whatever I do and do machine-like is what I want to do.” Warhol was referring to his newfound process of silk-screen printing images repeatedly onto a single canvas. This act of undermining any translation or evidence of the artist’s hand in favor of a mass-produced, machine-like look appealed to Warhol. Once he discovered the process and implications of working with silk screens, the content of Warhol’s output as a painter became inextricably linked to the process by which he created his art.

Warhol’s grid-like paintings of dollar bills from 1962 are his earliest attempts at silk-screen printing, when the artist was still getting to know the process. At that time he used his own drawings as the basis to create the silk-screened print. He reportedly was not entirely happy with the result, calling 129 Die in Jet!, another painting based on a drawing, “smeary.” But Warhol soon learned that it was possible to use photographs as the basis for a silk-screen print, and the resulting image proved much sharper – though not too sharp – and thus to Warhol’s liking.Warhol’s Liz #1 Early Colored Liz, which will be featured in Sotheby’s upcoming Evening sale of Contemporary Art on November 13, illustrates well Warhol’s process as a painter.

Materially, the artwork consists of acrylic paint and silk-screen ink on canvas. We see a flat yellow background surrounding a spotty yet recognizable image of Elizabeth Taylor, the actress and celebrity, who, like Marilyn Monroe and Jackie Kennedy, repeatedly served as Warhol’s subject.Andy Warhol’s Liz #1 Early Colored Liz will be offered at the Contemporary Art Evening sale on 13 November.Here Warhol appropriated a 1950s publicity photo of Taylor as the source material for the silk screen. Warhol worked with professionals to have the photos he chose transferred onto the mesh of a silk screen. When Warhol passed an ink-laden squeegee over the mesh as the silk screen sat atop his canvas, ink would pass through the mesh and impress a print of his image onto the canvas. Areas of the mesh where a layer of glue has been applied – in Warhol’s case, the “negative” space of the photos he selected – keep paint from passing through to the canvas.

Observing the grainier areas of Liz’s hair, it’s clear that Warhol first applied the yellow paint before adding the layer of black ink that comprises her face. Her intense red lips and eye shadow were also applied during separate passes of the squeegee. To Warhol the noticeable “imperfections” – such as the faint areas of Liz’s hair and the way the lipstick bleeds onto her chin – weren’t signs of a poorly pulled silk screen-image but rather welcome indications of how chance influenced his work. As Warhol’s biographers Tony Scherman and David Dalton point out, Warhol “was not after a picture-perfect, sharp-edged result; he wanted the trashy immediacy of a tabloid news photo.”By his use of the silk-screen process mixed with high-key acrylic paint, Warhol imbued Liz #1 Early Colored Liz with a kind of tragic radiance. And by re-using the silk screen of the ’50s publicity photo for other portraits of the film star and tabloid fixation, Warhol investigated through multiplicity the commodification of fame.

 

Still today Andy Warhol makes the news

QC Godwin-Ternbach Museum Receives Warhol Silkscreens | www.qgazette.com | Queens Gazette: The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts has given the Godwin-Ternbach Museum at Queens College seven color silkscreen prints by the celebrated pop artist.

via Andy Warhol and His Process | Sotheby’s.

For kids – more history

Johannes Gutenberg invented the printing press. While this may not sound like a big deal at first, the printing press is often considered as the most important invention in modern times. Think about how important information is today. Without books and computers you wouldn’t be able to learn, to pass on information, or to share scientific discoveries. Prior to Gutenberg inventing the printing press, making a book was a laborious process. It wasn’t that hard to write a letter to one person by hand, but to create thousands of books for many people to read was nearly impossible. Without the printing press we wouldn’t have had the Scientific Revolution or the Renaissance. Our world would be very different.

via Johannes Gutenberg Biography for Kids: Inventor of the Printing Press.